Human Suffering: UN Secretary General Convenes World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul

WATCH LIVE: https://www.worldhumanitariansummit.org/live

WHS

The world is witnessing the highest level of human suffering since the Second World War. This is why, for the first time in the 70-year history of the United Nations, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has convened the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in Istanbul on 23 -24 May.

The Summit will be held at the highest political level possible. Some 5,000 participants, including 65 Heads of State and Government, 177 UN Member States, NGOs, the private sector,  aid organizations, civil society, affected communities and youth, among others will attend the Summit.

The Summit has three main goals:

  • To re-inspire and reinvigorate a commitment to humanity and to the universality of humanitarian principles.
  • To initiate a set of concrete actions and commitments aimed at enabling countries and communities to better prepare for and respond to crises, and be resilient to shocks.
  • To share best practices which can help save lives around the world, put affected people at the center of humanitarian action, and alleviate suffering.

The agenda for the Summit was determined after an extensive and inclusive worldwide consultation between May 2014 and July 2015  with over 23,000 people in 153 countries, involving humanitarian stakeholders, including affected people and communities. The consultation process generated over 300 recommendations grouped under five key action areas: dignity; safety; resilience; partnerships and finance. The Aga Khan Development Network was among the hosts and co-chairs of regional consultations that took place in South and Central Asia.

In February 2016, the Secretary-General published his report entitled ‘One Humanity: Shared Responsibility’. In his report, he called for the need to place humanity—people’s safety, dignity and their right to thrive—at the centre of global decision making. The Secretary-General called upon Member States, the United Nations and humanitarian organizations and other relevant stakeholders to accept and act upon five core responsibilities to deliver for humanity.

The Leaders’ Segment to be held on May 23, will be an opportunity to discuss the five core responsibilities of the Agenda for Humanity.  These five core responsibilities are:  one, Political Leadership to Prevent and End Conflict; two, Uphold the Norms that Safeguard Humanity; three, Leave No One Behind; four, Change People’s Lives – from Delivering Aid to Ending Need; and five, Invest in Humanity.

The United Nations Secretary-General has called for humanity—people’s safety, dignity and the right to thrive—to be placed at the heart of global decision-making. To deliver for humanity, stakeholders must act on five core responsibilities.

The United Nations Secretary-General has called for humanity—people’s safety, dignity and the right to thrive—to be placed at the heart of global decision-making. To deliver for humanity, stakeholders must act on five core responsibilities.

A statement issued by top officials of the United Nations said:

“We have in front of us a singular opportunity to stand together and deliver a message that we will not accept the erosion of humanity which we see in the world today. We must not fail the people who need us, when they need us most.  Istanbul is this opportunity.  History will judge us by how we use this moment.  We must not let down the many millions of men, women and children in dire need.”

For livestreaming of the summit, click https://www.worldhumanitariansummit.org/live.

Date posted: May 23, 2016

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