Naser-e Khosraw’s Risky and Dangerous Homeward Journey, from Michael Wolfe’s “One Thousand Roads to Mecca”

In our concluding part of the series on  Naser-e Khosraw’s travels, the Ismaili poet, philosopher and traveller provides a grim look at the merciless deserts of Arabia and the predatory ways of the Arab Bedouin. He encounters camel riding pirates, and the price of safe-passage costs him and his party their money and their clothes. But he also finds great consolation during a nine-month stay in the city of Lhasa. Read his fascinating account by clicking Naser-e Khosraw’s Dangerous Homeward Journey: From “One Thousand Roads to Mecca” by Michael Wolfe or on the following image:

A portrait of Naser-e Khosraw on a large rock in Badakhshan. Please click on image to read the concluding part of his journey. Photo: Ali M. Rajput., UK.

A portrait of Naser-e Khosraw on a large rock in Badakhshan. Please click on image to read the concluding part of his journey. Photo: Ali M. Rajput., UK.

One thought on “Naser-e Khosraw’s Risky and Dangerous Homeward Journey, from Michael Wolfe’s “One Thousand Roads to Mecca”

  1. I am in the process of translating AgaKhan the III – Sultan Muhammad Shah from English to Persian. I am hoping this small effort would shed light to the true character behind that face and the people he led be an example for many who are seeking freedom of thought and practice. I hope I be able to have it published someday.

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